Academics

Academic Policies

Grading 

Effective immediately, the University will expand the pass/fail option for undergraduate courses in the College of Arts & Sciences, Kenan-Flagler Business School, School of Information and Library Science, Hussman School of Journalism and Media, School of Education, Adams School of Dentistry and the Gillings School of Global Public Health.

As an alternative to earning a letter grade, Undergraduate students will have the option to declare any undergraduate course (numbered below 700) pass/fail. Courses declared pass/fail in Fall 2020 will be eligible to be used toward major, minor, General Education and any other degree requirement (more information below). There is no limit on the number of courses that a student can declare pass/fail in Fall 2020. Any courses declared pass/fail in Fall 2020 will not count toward any graduation limits on pass/fail courses.

Students are strongly encouraged to meet with Academic Advising or an advisor in their respective professional school prior to making any decisions on declaring an undergraduate course or courses as pass/fail for Fall 2020. Undergraduate students can elect to make any course pass/fail by the last day of classes, November 17, 2020.

Courses declared pass/fail in Fall 2020 will receive one of three grades: Pass, Low Pass or Fail. Grades of C or higher will be converted to a Pass. Grades of C-, D+ or D will be converted to a Low Pass. Grades of F will remain a Fail. Courses that receive a Low Pass cannot be used for graduation requirements or prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher.

The University will continue to use the ‘CV’ grade as an alternative to the Incomplete (‘IN’) grade for any undergraduate student adversely affected by the public health emergency. CV grades address the accessibility and equity issues of some students who are unable to complete coursework. Additionally, courses dropped after August 31, 2020 will have the withdrawal notation ‘WCV’ on student transcripts. Courses with a ‘WCV’ notation will not count toward the 16-hour limit of WC (withdrawal by student choice) over the course of a student’s academic career.

This policy applies only to undergraduate courses in the schools listed above. Students, including undergraduates, enrolled in other professional schools or programs in The Graduate School will follow the decisions of their professional school or of The Graduate School.

How this Pass/Fail Accommodation Applies to Undergraduate Students

The existing policies for pass/fail will be suspended for the Fall 2020 semester.

  • Undergraduate students will be able to declare any undergraduate course (numbered below 700) pass/fail.
  • Courses declared pass/fail in Fall 2020 are eligible to be used toward major, minor, General Education and any other degree requirement.
  • There is no limit on the number of Fall 2020 courses that a student can declare pass/fail.
  • Any Fall 2020 courses declared pass/fail will not count toward any graduation limits on pass/fail courses.

Faculty will not know in advance if students have declared a course pass/fail.

  • All courses will be graded as normal (letter grades)
  • Consistent with the current criteria for students who opt for pass/fail grading, Faculty will not be aware of students who elect the pass/fail grading option when entering final grades.

Courses declared as pass/fail will receive one of three grades:

  • Pass – Courses completed with a grade of C or higher
    • Fulfill all degree requirements (major, minor, prerequisite and GENED)
    • Count as earned semester hours
    • Do not factor into the GPA
  • Low Pass – Courses completed with a grade of C-, D+ or D
    • Only fulfill degree requirements that do not require a C or better
    • Cannot be used for course prerequisites requiring a grade of C or higher
    • Cannot count towards the required number of C or higher hours for a major/minor
    • Count as earned semester hours
    • Do not factor into the GPA
  • Fail – Courses completed with a grade of F
    • Do not count as earned semester hours
    • Factor into the GPA as a graded F

The deadline to elect pass/fail is November 17, 2020. For the Fall 2020 semester, undergraduate students can elect to place a course on pass/fail or remove a course from pass/fail no later than Tuesday, November 17, 2020 via the Office of the University Registrar’s website.

‘CV’ Grade

The University continues to use the ‘CV’ grade in Fall 2020. On March 23, 2020, the University created a new grade of ‘CV’ as an alternative to the Incomplete (‘IN’) grade. ‘CV’ grades address the accessibility and equity issues of some students who are adversely affected and/or unable to complete coursework due to the global public health emergency.

How this will apply:

  • A ‘CV’ grade will work similarly to an ‘IN’ grade for an individual student. As with an ‘IN’ grade, a student could pass the course; however, the student requires more time to complete particular assignments after the course has ended. Once work is complete, the grade will convert to a letter grade or pass/fail grade, depending upon the grading basis of the course.
    • ‘CV’ grades will not be included in GPA calculation, will not count toward credits earned, will not satisfy graduation requirements and will not be calculated as a 0.00 GPA for eligibility.
    • The deadline to replace ‘CV’ designations with permanent grades will extend three months past the typical 8 weeks into the following semester for undergraduates, differentiating it from the ‘IN’ grade. The deadline to complete work for Fall 2020 ‘CV’ courses is Tuesday, June 1, 2021. Failure to complete work by the deadline will result in an F*.

Given this grading shift, we will suspend the Dean’s List and class rank for the Fall 2020 semester. In addition, UNC‐Chapel Hill will include a transcript note on all undergraduate academic records, regardless of grading basis, indicating the extraordinary circumstances of the global public health emergency during Fall 2020.

Again, we strongly encourage undergraduate students to consult proactively with Academic Advising or an advisor in their respective professional school if they are experiencing academic challenges or have any questions about utilizing these grading accommodations. Advisors can help students think about the possible impact to their graduation timeline, as well as future decisions and opportunities.

Flexibility and Accommodations If You Get Sick

If you are experiencing symptoms, are identified as a close contact, and/or test positive for COVID-19, Campus Health will connect you to campus resources based on your individual needs.

You may also choose to submit a request for a University Approved Absence through the  University Approved Absences Office. Any student asked or required to quarantine or isolate due to Covid-19 will be approved for a University Approved Absence for any classes missed.

More information

For more information visit the In the Classroom page and the Academics page on the Student Care Hub.

 

Modes of Instruction

Undergraduate Students

As of August 19, all undergraduate courses are remote. This means that you will participate in all of your courses remotely for the remainder of the Fall 2020 semester and will not attend any in-person session in a classroom.

Keep in mind that remote classes have a scheduled class time but no physical location. You will participate from your residence hall, campus study space, off-campus residence, or from far away from campus.

Your instructor will determine whether the class will be taught synchronously, asynchronously, or a combination of the two.

  • Synchronous instruction means you participate in the class at the same time as the instructor. In other words, the class is live.
  • Asynchronous instruction means the class is recorded for you to watch on your time. In other words, there is not real-time instruction.
  • A combination of synchronous and asynchronous will include both real-time and recorded instruction. For example, you listen to a recorded version of a lecture (asynchronous instruction) and then join a “break out room” to participate in a live discussion with your instructor and classmates (synchronous instruction) during a designated class time.

Graduate and Professional Students

Decisions about the modes of instruction for specific courses are made by deans, department chairs and their faculty to create a balance of course offerings and comply with guidance from public health officials.

You are not required to take all courses in the same format and may have a schedule that includes multiple types of courses. The chart below provides more detail about what you can expect from each mode of instruction.

Mode of Instruction Key Features   Who should register? 
Face-to-Face/Hybrid ·       Students and the  instructor attend  required  in-person (“face-to-face”) sessions in the classroom  at a scheduled time. 

·       The instructor may also  include  “hybrid” components, such as  rotating which students are in the classroom on a given day or holding full class meetings remotely.

·       The classroom environment will be configured to support compliance with University guidelines, and students and instructors are required to wear a face mask  and practice physical distancing.

·       Types of  courses that may be  taught as  Face-to-Face/Hybrid include high impact courses and experiential education courses.

In-person learners (students planning to physically attend courses in the classroom, including students living in Carolina Housing and students commuting from an off-campus residence)

 

 

HyFlex ·       The instructor and students attend scheduled in-person sessions in the classroom with some percent of students joining remotely and synchronously (at the same time  as on-campus students) with the use of classroom technology.

·       Classes may  also  be recorded for remote students  joining asynchronously (outside of the scheduled class session time without real-time interaction). For example, a remote student joining synchronously may listen to an instructor give a live lecture and then join a “break out room” to participate in a discussion with classmates.  A remote student joining asynchronously may listen to a recorded version of the lecture  later  and post on a discussion board.

·       Students decide whether they wish to participate in the classroom, remotely, or a combination of the two throughout the semester.

·       Depending on the space availability and class enrollment, in-person students may  rotate by day of the week to give  students  equal opportunity  to be in the classroom.

In-person learners (students planning to physically attend courses in the classroom)

 

Fully
remote  learners      (students who will not be physically coming to campus this fall and need a schedule that allows them to participate remotely in  all  their courses)

Remote (RE)  ·       Students participate remotely for the entire semester and do not attend any in-person sessions in the classroom.

·       Remote classes will have a scheduled class time but no physical location. Students can participate from a residence hall, campus study space, off-campus residence, or from far away from campus.

·       The instructor will determine whether the class will be taught synchronously,  asynchronously, or a combination of the two.

·       Types of courses that may be taught  with this mode  include large classes where physical distancing could not occur.

In-person learners (students planning to physically attend courses in the classroom)

 

Fully
remote
learners (students who will not be physically coming to campus this fall)

Remote + Recitation

 

·       Students participate in remote lecture sessions and a small, required synchronous recitation, in which students and an instructor interact in real-time. 

·       Depending on the course, the recitation sections may be Face-to-Face/Hybrid, HyFlex and/or Remote.  When a course has a single recitation section, it will be  HyFlex. When a course has multiple recitation sections, there may be a mix of Remote sections (for fully  remote learners) and Face-to-Face sections (for in-person learners).

·       Types of courses that may be taught as Remote + Recitation include courses of different sizes currently taught with a lecture-recitation structure.

In-person learners (students planning to physically attend courses in the classroom)

 

Fully
remote
learners (students who will not be physically coming to campus this fall)

 

 

Flexibility and Accommodations

If you have questions about a course’s mode of instruction and/or flexible participation due to a non-medical personal circumstance, your first step should be to contact your instructor and attempt to find a solution together. If you want to explore other course offerings that better suit your circumstances for the fall semester, contact your academic advisor.

If you are  in need of an accommodation  and  are already registered with Accessibility Resources and Service (ARS) or have a documented disabilities or medical condition, contact Accessibility Resources and Service for further assistance .

Flexibility and Accommodations If You Get Sick

If you are experiencing symptoms, are identified as a close contact, and/or test positive for COVID-19, Campus Health will connect you to campus resources based on your individual needs.

You may also choose to submit a request for a University Approved Absence through the University Approved Absences Office.

Remote Learning Support

Your instructors are the best resources for course-based questions. Make sure you are comfortable using Sakai by reviewing the comprehensive guide developed by the  Carolina Office for Online Learning.  Stay tuned to Sakai and emails from your instructors regarding particular courses.

Zoom

Zoom will play a critical role in remote learning experience. Take some time to review the Tips for Attending Class in Zoom guide to help improve your remote learning experience, and that of your instructors and classmates. Zoom is a great tool to stay connected and collaborate with classmates outside of class, too.

Sign in to Zoom at UNC.zoom.us (not at zoom.us) using your ONYEN to ensure you’re able to access your remote course sessions, view recordings, and connect with your instructors and classmates.

Your instructors are the best resources for course-based questions. Make sure you are comfortable using Sakai by reviewing the comprehensive guide developed by the  Carolina Office for Online Learning.  Stay tuned to Sakai and emails from your instructors regarding particular courses.

Student Stores

To accommodate remote learners, the Student Stores is offering free shipping on textbook deliveries to your door. The Student Stores continues to provide free shipping for rental returns as well as access to free digital books and course materials.

Additional Online Support and Services

In order to support remote learning, many other services that you may be accustomed to accessing while on-campus are not offering similar services online.

Graduate Teaching Assistants

Visit the Keep Teaching website to access resources for all instructors on campus.